Housing bulletin - June 2022

Housing bulletin - June 2022

Contents

House prices

Private rented housing

Empty Properties

Evictions and repossessions

Housing New Builds

Affordable Housing Demand

Social Housing Demand

Homelessness

Rough Sleepers

House prices

Figure 1 (below) shows the average house price in all boroughs within Greater Manchester (GM) as of June 2022. The average price in Bury is 3rd highest in GM after Trafford and Stockport.

Figure 1 Average house price across Greater Manchester, all properties

This list shows the average sale price of different types of property across Greater Manchester.

  • Greater Manchester
    • All properties: £223,337
    • Detached: £388,298
    • Semi Detached: £250,106
    • Terraced: £180,095
    • Flats and Maisonettes: £168,102
  • Bolton
    • All properties: £178,647
    • Detached: £320,150
    • Semi Detached: £191,257
    • Terraced: £141,872
    • Flats and Maisonettes: £107,777
  • Bury
    • All properties: £237,343
    • Detached: £402,290
    • Semi Detached: £257,995
    • Terraced: £184,854
    • Flats and Maisonettes: £127,897
  • Manchester
    • All properties: £225,113
    • Detached: £416,564
    • Semi Detached: £285,313
    • Terraced: £215,160
    • Flats and Maisonettes: £186,622
  • Oldham
    • All properties: £182,943
    • Detached: £326,533
    • Semi Detached: £205,763
    • Terraced: £149,725
    • Flats and Maisonettes: £124,273
  • Rochdale
    • All properties: £182,303
    • Detached: £310,833
    • Semi Detached: £193,286
    • Terraced: £141,942
    • Flats and Maisonettes: £95,238
  • Salford
    • All properties: £213,056
    • Detached: £396,511
    • Semi Detached: £257,802
    • Terraced: £190,912
    • Flats and Maisonettes: £164,938
  • Stockport
    • All properties: £283,192
    • Detached: £490,137
    • Semi Detached: £303,216
    • Terraced: £217,167
    • Flats and Maisonettes: £163,146
  • Tameside
    • All properties: £200,255
    • Detached: £344,179
    • Semi Detached: £220,241
    • Terraced: £166,255
    • Flats and Maisonettes: £124,692
  • Trafford
    • All properties: £362,475
    • Detached: £678,634
    • Semi Detached: £402,362
    • Terraced: £307,129
    • Flats and Maisonettes: £218,453
  • Wigan
    • All properties: £178,719
    • Detached: £299,216
    • Semi Detached: £179,959
    • Terraced: £136,851
    • Flats and Maisonettes: £93,986

Source: Land Registry UK House Price Index.

Figure 2 (below) shows the average house prices in Bury over the previous five years. Despite the Covid-19 pandemic house prices have continued to rise. The next update will be available March 2023.

Figure 3 (below) shows the number of sales in Bury in each year for the previous five years, as expected sales reduced in 2020 due to the Covid-19 pandemic but increased again in 2021.

Figure 2 Average house price in Bury Figure 3 Number of sales per year


Private rented housing

Figure 4 (below) shows the average rent of private properties in Bury, by bedroom size compared with Greater Manchester. The average rent in Bury is slightly lower than GM.

Figure 4 Average private rent in Bury compared to Greater Manchester (2021/22)

Local Housing Allowance is a form of Housing Benefit for tenants who rent from private landlords.

Bury LHA rates fall in to two geographical areas. The table below shows the weekly rates of LHA. The Bolton and Bury rates apply to the north of the M60 and M62 motorway. This includes Bury, Radcliffe, Ramsbottom, Tottington and most of Whitefield. The Central Manchester rates apply to properties to the south of the M60 and M62 motorway. This area covers addresses in Prestwich and a small part of Whitefield.

Weekly rates of Local Housing Allowance for 2022/23 for 2022/23
Number of rooms requiredBolton and BuryCentral Manchester
1-bedroom shared accommodation£66.74£75.50
1-bedroom self-contained accommodation£90.90£138.08
2 bedrooms£110.47£149.59
3 bedrooms£136.93£166.85
4 bedrooms£184.11£218.63

Figure 5 (below) shows that most tenants relying on LHA to pay their rent will have a shortfall. Although the Central Manchester rate exceeds the average rent for a one-bedroom property, properties in Prestwich are traditionally higher than average.

Figure 5 Average private rent in Bury compare with LHA


Empty Properties

Figure 6 (below) shows the number of vacant properties in Bury from 2017 to 2021. The figures are reported from 1 January to 31 December and published annually in March. The next update will be available in March 2023.

Figure 7 (below) shows the number of long-term empty properties (vacant for over 6 months) in Bury from 2017. The number of long-term empty properties has increased gradually since 2019. The figures are reported from 1 January to 31 December and published annually in March. The next update will be available in March 2023.

Figure 6 All vacant properties in Bury Figure 7 Number of long term empty properties in Bury


Evictions and repossessions

Mortgage repossessions - Figure 8 (below) shows the number of eviction warrants in cases of mortgage repossessions in both GM and Bury from 2018 to June 2022. The reduction in warrants granted in 2020 was the result of the Government placing a ban on evictions due to the covid-19 pandemic. This restriction was in place until 31 May 2021.

Figure 8 Number of mortgage eviction warrants granted in Bury compared to Greater Manchester

Private and Social Rented Evictions - Obtaining an eviction warrant is the final stage of the repossession procedure for landlords (social and private) to evict their tenant.

Figure 9 (below) shows the number of eviction warrants granted in Bury since 2018 compared to Greater Manchester.

Figure 10 (below) shows the number of eviction warrants granted to social and private landlords in Bury Council, by quarter, since 2018. The number of warrants is starting to increase again since the restrictions were lifted.

Figure 11 (below) shows the number of warrants split by landlord type. In 2018 and 2019 most warrants were by from social landlords. However, since the evictions ban ended in May 2021, private landlords have been granted more warrants.

Figure 9 Eviction Warrants In Bury and Greater Manchester Figure 10 Eviction Warrants in Bury Figure 11 Eviction Warrants In Bury by landlord type


Housing New Builds

Figure 12 (below) shows the number of residential dwellings constructed by private developers and housing associations in Bury compared to Greater Manchester overall. Figures are published annually; the next update will be available after March 2023.

Figure 12 Number of dwellings completed in Bury and Greater Manchester


Affordable Housing Demand

The Council manages an Affordable Housing Scheme to give individuals and families better access to housing and help first time buyers get a foot on the property ladder.

There has been a 99.6% increase in applications received in 2021/22 compared to 2019/20. As of 31 March 2022, there were 2,701 live applications registered on the Affordable Housing Scheme.

Figure 13 (below) shows the area applicants would choose to live; applicants can select up to six area choices. As can be seen, the majority of applicants would prefer to live in Bury.

Figure 14 (below) shows the property type that applicants require; applicants can select more than one property type. The majority of applicants would prefer a three-bedroom house.

Figure 13 Area choice Figure 14 property type required

82% of applicants would like to buy or part-buy a property on the scheme. The majority of applicants applying for affordable housing are currently living in private rented accommodation.


Social Housing Demand

At the end of June 2022 there were 1,577 applicants on the Council's housing register. Once registered for social housing applicants are placed into priority bands depending on their housing need. The bands are defined as follows:

  • Band 1: Urgent housing need for example, homeless and in priority need
  • Band 2: High housing need for example, high medical or welfare need to move
  • Band 3: Medium housing need for example, owed a homeless prevention duty
  • Band 4: Low housing need for example, one bedroom overcrowded
  • Band 5: Assessment of need for example, no local connection

Figure 15 (below) shows the breakdown of applicants by priority band. The majority of applicants are in band 3, medium housing need.

Figure 15 Number of applicants by band

Figure 16 (below) shows the number of bedrooms required by those on the housing register and figure 17 (below) shows the average number of days these applicants have been waiting on the register. Average waiting times are over one year.

Figure 16 Number of bedrooms required Figure 17 Average days waiting time by bedrooms required


Homelessness

The Homelessness and Housing Options Service provides a range of services to households in need of housing advice, homelessness assistance and temporary accommodation. Some enquiries are resolved with advice only, while others require more intensive support and ongoing casework.

Figure 18 (below) shows the number of new approaches to the Homeless Assessment & Support Service. The number of approaches has steadily increased since the end of 2019/20.

Figure 18 Number of new approaches to Homeless Assessment & Support Service

Under homeless legislation, temporary accommodation must be provided for anyone who is assessed by the local authority as being homeless, eligible and in priority need.

Figure 19 (below) shows the number of households placed in statutory temporary accommodation during each quarter from 2018/19. It also shows the actual number in temporary accommodation on the last day of each quarter. Bury Council do not use bed and breakfast as temporary accommodation. The numbers in temp on the last day of the quarter has increased considerably since June 2020, from 30 to 102 in June 2022. This is due to larger families coming in to temp and lack of family homes and high private rents to move households on.

Figure 19 Number of households in temporary accommodation

There are three duties which can be owed to homeless applicants, depending on their circumstances. These are:

  • Prevention Duty - Applicant is at risk of becoming homeless within 56 days.
  • Relief Duty - Applicant is homeless, eligible for assistance and has a local connection. The relief duty last for 56 days.
  • Main Duty - The main duty will be triggered where the 56 day relief duty failed to resolve the applicant's homelessness and the applicant is homeless, eligible, in priority need, not intentionally homeless and has a local connection. The main duty will continue until a suitable offer of settled accommodation is made to the applicant

Figure 20 (below) shows the number of each duty accepted in Bury, by quarter from 2019/20 to Q1 2022/23.

Figure 20 Number of applicants owed each legal duty


Rough Sleepers

Greater Manchester launched A Bed Every Night initiative in 2018. Since then Bury have secured funding to provide an outreach service dedicated to supporting rough sleepers in Bury.

Figure 21 (below) shows the number of rough sleepers being supported by Bury Council since July 20.

Figure 22 (below) shows the number of rough sleepers moving into suitable accommodation, including, social tenancies, supported accommodation and returning to family or friends.

Figure 21 Number of rough sleepers being supported Figure 22 Number of rough sleepers moving into suitable accommodation