Conservation areas

The following Conservation Areas have been designated in Bury:

All Saints, Whitefield

All Saints Conservation Area was designated by the Council in March 2004. It represents a fine and well preserved example of mainly residential development in the south of the Borough, which grew after the construction of the new turnpike roads and the coming of the railway during the 19 century.

Ainsworth

Ainsworth village lies to the northwest of Bury and developed as a typical upland farming settlement at a nucleus around the old Bury and Bolton Road. The Conservation Area covers the core of the later surviving parts of the village and includes 19 century stone terraces along Church Street and earlier buildings around the Church and Chapel. The buildings are predominantly constructed of stone and the area is much enhanced by substantial groups of trees and public and private open spaces.

Bury New Road, Ramsbottom

On the 27 March 2007 the Council's Planning Control Committee authorised the amalgamation and extension of the Ramsbottom, Tanners and Bury New Road Conservation Areas to form one larger Ramsbottom Conservation Area. The new boundary is now in force and is the same as that proposed in the Appraisal Map attached to the appraisal information. The website information will be fully amended as soon as possible.

This conservation area was designated in September 2004. It is centred on substantial late Georgian and Victorian stone dwellings which were built along Bury New Road in the middle of the 19 century. The history of the area is linked to the fortunes of Park Chapel, Walmersley Road, and the wealth of the Porritt family, chapel members with holdings in Stubbins. Park Cottage, 43 Bury New Road, was built for a new minister in 1847 and this was followed by a number of large Victorian terraces and detached properties. The dwellings sit in large landscaped grounds with stone boundary walls and gate piers, and they dominate the road out of Ramsbottom to the east.

Bury Town Centre

The Conservation Area encloses the historic core of the town and incorporates the best of its architectural heritage with a high concentration of statutorily listed buildings. The modern form of the area results from the mix of commercial and civic buildings, largely dating from the 19th century, arranged around and linked by public open spaces. There are two distinct areas within the Conservation Area reflecting the 19 century mixed use of the area with residential property originally to the south and commercial property to the north.

Despite the richness of the Conservation Area's architectural fabric, the character and appearance of the area is generally cohesive. It's character is supported by the recently revealed remains of Bury Castle and the development of the East Lancs Railway around Bolton Street Station.

Holcombe

The Conservation Area includes the upper valley settlement of Holcombe Village a number of small agricultural hamlets and groups of stone buildings which are all typical of the West Pennine Moor area. The form of Holcombe Village is virtually unique in the area as it provides an example of a pre-industrial settlement almost untouched by recent development. The Conservation Area includes a number of important listed buildings including the landmark building of Peel Tower which dominates the landscape and the northern part of the Borough.

The Conservation Area lies on the east facing slope of Holcombe Hill overlooking the valley of the River Irwell. The area has been settled at least since the early medieval period with a largely agricultural economy, although with some small scale quarrying. The resulting landscape form is one of great aesthetic value.

Mount Pleasant

Mount Pleasant Conservation Area is located on the exposed shoulder of Snape Hill below Harden Moor to the north of Bury. The settlement developed as an isolated factory village and illustrates an important aspect of early textile industrial growth in the Upper Pennine area. The Mill complex employed over a 100 people at its height.

The Mill has now been demolished and the village redeveloped to incorporate new housing which blends in to the stone terrace style of the original village. The Conservation Area covers the whole of the building group. The earliest surviving buildings date from the 18 century and substantial numbers of the buildings are statutorily listed including the public house.

Poppythorn, Prestwich

Poppythorn Conservation Area was designated by the Council in March 2004. It represents a fine and well preserved example of mainly residential development in the south of the Borough, which grew after the construction of the new turnpike roads and the coming of the railway during the 19 century.

Pot Green

Pot Green Conservation Area focuses on a small, tightly knit group of cottages which have evolved through the 17, 18 and 19 centuries and remain set in a woodland landscape. The hamlet, which is located at the southern base of Holcombe Hill, represents an early stage in the industrial history of the area being based on the cottage industries of spinning and weaving. Archaeological remains also suggest the siting of two small water-powered mills in the wooded area between Pot Green and Woodhey Road.

The Conservation Area is now tightly enclosed by modern development to the south and the woodland to the north but has survived as a distinct and relatively unaltered group of vernacular, largely stone buildings of architectural and historic interest.

Ramsbottom

On the 27 March 2007 the Council's Planning Control Committee authorised the amalgamation and extension of the Ramsbottom, Tanners and Bury New Road Conservation Areas to form one larger Ramsbottom Conservation Area. The new boundary is now in force and is the same as that proposed in the Appraisal Map attached to the appraisal information. The website information will be fully amended as soon as possible.

Ramsbottom lies at a point where routes along and across the Irwell Valley converge. The development of the town dates from the industrial expansion around the 1820s most notably related to the Grant family. The wealth generated by the spread of industrial development financed a programme of rebuilding which created the present day town.

The Conservation Area is centred on the town's axial point at the Market Place and reaches out along Bolton and Bridge Streets, primarily focused on the 19 Century commercial, retail and civic development of the town.

The Conservation Area exemplifies the best of the stone architecture which dominates the valley area to the north of Bury and includes a significant number of listed buildings.

Rowlands / Brooksbottoms

Rowlands and Brooksbottoms Conservation Area is again comprised of two distinct but related parts.

Rowlands lies on the high ground to the east of the East Lancashire Railway line. This area exhibits a mix of architectural styles varying from 18 century vernacular to the 19 century neo-gothic. The area also includes some excellent groups of trees notably in the churchyard and some important public spaces.

Brooksbottoms lies on the River Irwell by the mouth of Gollinrod Gorge and in contrast reflects the harsher character of the industrial revolution. The area is very much dominated by the four storey former Hoyles Mill (now "The Spinnings"), surrounded by small terraces of workers housing. The Conservation Area includes the railway viaduct and station which is very much a part of the character of the village and the Irwell Valley.

Summerseat

Summerseat Conservation Area consists of two parts, Higher and Lower Summerseat.

Higher Summerseat, on the west side is the older part of the settlement consisting of a number of small stone terraces, two public houses and a farm with some of the surviving buildings dating from the early 18 century. This small group is set within farmland to the east and south and open space to the north. The area remained rather isolated until the inter-war years when the building of Newcombe Road improved the access facilitating new house building which now encloses the Conservation Area to the west. The setting of this group is much enhanced by woodland in the grounds of Summerseat House and Peel Hall.

Lower Summerseat lies adjacent to the Irwell to the north and east and is largely a development of the industrial revolution. The area consists of small rows of stone terraces surrounded by open scrub and pasture. The character of the area is again enhanced by the wooded valleys.

St Mary's Park, Prestwich

The Conservation Area contains a number of areas of distinct architectural form united by St Mary's Park, incorporating Church Lane in the north and extending to the edge of Butterstile Lane. The whole area forms part of a pleasant wooded landscape. The area is dominated by St Mary's Church which dates back to the 15 century, and the mature treescape within Prestwich Clough.

The residential parts of the Conservation Area are typified by tree lined streets with substantial properties in large grounds mostly dating from the mid-19 century. The combination of large private grounds and public open spaces results in a lush and heavily tree-lined appearance of the Conservation Area.

Tanners, Ramsbottom

On the 27 March 2007 the Council's Planning Control Committee authorised the amalgamation and extension of the Ramsbottom, Tanners and Bury New Road Conservation Areas to form one larger Ramsbottom Conservation Area. The new boundary is now in force and is the same as that proposed in the Appraisal Map attached to the appraisal information. The website information will be fully amended as soon as possible.

The Tanners area was originally a small 18th century settlement on the western slopes of the Irwell Valley above Ramsbottom centre. Some 18 and early 19 century buildings still remain in the area and these were added to in the latter part of the 19 century creating a residential settlement clinging to the hillside above the valley. The grouping of the dwellings on the steep slopes together with the stone retaining and boundary walls; gate piers, stone archways, ginnels, snickets, and stone set roadways and paths, has produced a well preserved area which has its own special character. It was designated a conservation area in September 2004.

Walmersley

The Council designated this conservation area in November 2003. It covers Christ Church, its churchyard, the former school and school master's house, together with the adjacent Spur Petroleum site which contains the former Walmersley Brewery buildings. The whole site is an excellent record of the 19 century history of a small but important part of Walmersley, and illustrates generally well preserved elements of stone built ecclesiastical and industrial architecture from the mid to late 19 century.

View Conservation Areas on a map